Build your PiZero Swarm with OTG networking

January 7, 2017 in Hardware, Raspberry PI, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial, Uncategorized by Adrian Marius

The Raspberry Pi Zero can act as a network adapter via a USB cable enabling you to carry around a Docker Engine and full Linux OS in your pocket.

Here is the article on building a PiZero Docker Swarm :

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The HackerBoards.com New Year’s 2017 guide to Linux friendly single board computers has now been published.

January 7, 2017 in Hardware, Linux, Raspberry PI by Adrian Marius

The HackerBoards.com New Year’s 2017 guide to Linux friendly single board computers has now been published. The project turned up 90 boards, ranging from powerful media playing rigs to power-sipping IoT platforms. A detailed analysis with summaries of each board is at http://hackerboards.com/ringing-in-2017-with-90-hacker-friendly-single-board-computers/, and a spreadsheet that compares the key specs of all 90 boards is at http://hackerboards.com/hacker-friendly-sbcs-table-170101.html

by admin

Bitbanged USB stack on a sub-$1 Cortex M0+ MCU

January 5, 2017 in ARM, Devices, DIY, Hardware, Microcontroller, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

A nice presentation about how to get USB running on an sub-$1 Cortex M0+ ARM microcontroller that has no built in USB hardware. The talk describes the implementation of a new bitbanged USB stack, starting with a primer on the USB PHY layer and continuing up the stack, concluding with “Palawan”, a feature-complete open-source bitbanged USB Low Speed stack available for use on microcontrollers priced for under a dollar. We’ll go over requirements for getting USB to work, as well as talking about USB timing, packet order, and how to integrate everything together.

by admin

Live debugging ESP8266 with open-source tools

December 28, 2016 in C, C++, DIY, ESP8266, Microcontroller, Tips & Tricks by admin

The ESP8266 is a low-cost Wi-Fi chip with full TCP/IP stack and MCU (Micro Controller Unit) capability produced by Shanghai-based Chinese manufacturer, Espressif Systems.

Since 2014, when first came in the attention of the western makers, the documentation became quite available, together with couple of SDKs and firmwares for various programming langauges like Lua, together with the low price, made reasonable easy to develop applications hosted on this tiny chip. Some of this little chip’s features:

  • 32-bit RISC CPU: Tensilica Xtensa LX106 running at 80 MHz (can be overclocked)
  • 64 KiB of instruction RAM, 96 KiB of data RAM
  • External QSPI flash – 512 KiB to 4 MiB (up to 16 MiB is supported)
  • IEEE 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi
  • Integrated TR switch, balun, LNA, power amplifier and matching network
  • WEP or WPA/WPA2 authentication, or open networks
  • 16 GPIO pins
  • SPI, I²C,
  • I²S interfaces with DMA (sharing pins with GPIO)
  • UART on dedicated pins, plus a transmit-only UART can be enabled on GPIO2
  • 1 10-bit ADC

Although developing software to be hosted on it isn’t such a big challenge like it used to be due to the plenty of information available on the internet, debugging the code running on the MCU is a different story. Luckily, at the Attachix blog there is a series of articles about writing software for this MCU, and in the 4th article the owner was nice enough to describe how to set up step-by-step debugging of the code either by command line or even from Eclipse IDE. Please follow this link for the entire article.

by admin

Unity Connect Open Beta: join the first talent marketplace dedicated to unity creators

November 7, 2016 in Game Engines, News, Unity by admin

unityLogovia unity blog: When Andrew joined the Open Beta of Unity Connect and posted his Task, he wasn’t expecting to get a response within 20 minutes… but that’s exactly what happened.

Tasks, a sort of “micro-job,” are a way for developers to connect with people who have skills to help them overcome roadblocks and keep their project moving toward the finish line. If you need help getting something done, you can post a Task on Unity Connect to broadcast a call for help. On the flip side, you can leverage your strengths to respond to Task posts and earn some extra income by helping others.

Being part of this new community doesn’t just benefit those who are looking for help. It also allows you to showcase your work and highlight your individual skills. You can build your visibility and reputation in the industry, engage with other creators, and even find creative inspiration. And, being present means you can be found by recruiters who are looking for Unity talent to fill their open positions — over 250 companies, ranging from small shops to large companies like Zynga, have already joined Unity Connect and started posting jobs.

If you are a recruiter or hiring manager, you can tap into the Unity Connect talent pool by creating a company page and posting your full-time or part-time jobs. You can also proactively source talent for your open positions using industry- and Unity-specific filters and skill tags. This allows you to zero in on the right people in a focused pool, and saves you the time of searching for needles in the haystacks of general professional networking sites.

Last week, at the Unite LA keynote, we announced the Open Beta of Unity Connect. Before the end of the show, thousands of Unity creators representing the full spectrum of game development skill sets — technical artists, programmers, level designers, VR specialists — had already signed on and started building their presence in the community.

source and more details: here.

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LibGDX game development with android studio – Creating Super Mario Bros

November 3, 2016 in Game Engines, Java, libGDX, Source Code, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

libgdx-logoA nice Youtube series of 32 videos by Brent Aureli about developing a Super Mario Bros game step by step using LibGDX and Android Studio. The videos include information about setting up libGDX with Android Studio, screens, viewports, aspect ratios, how to create a HUD, creating and rendering tilemaps, Box2D, spritesheeets and texture packer, animations, collisions, sound and music, moving & spawning items, and various other topics.

Read the rest of this entry →

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Unreal Engine Marketplace Update – October 2016

November 3, 2016 in Game Engines, News, Unreal Engine by admin

unreal-logo-smallFrom the Unreal Engine blog:

The month of October is officially behind us and with it came more treats than tricks for developers looking to find the right fit for their projects. As we’re quickly becoming accustomed to, last month saw a slew of new arrivals inside the Unreal Engine Marketplace that meet a wide variety of developer needs.  Read the rest of this entry →

Unreal Engine C++ Tutorial – Episode 1: Classes

October 5, 2016 in C++, Uncategorized, Unreal Engine by Adrian Marius

unreal-logo-smallRemaking the basics series for the newest version of the unreal engine, since some of the code is now outdated/deprecated.

 

Unreal Engine 4.13 Released

October 5, 2016 in Unreal Engine by Adrian Marius

unreal-logo-smallThis release brings hundreds of updates for Unreal Engine 4, including 145 improvements submitted by the community of Unreal Engine developers on GitHub

https://www.unrealengine.com/blog/unreal-engine-4-13-released

 

Unreal Engine 4.13 Released!

 

 

 

 

 

by admin

Blender 2.78 is released

October 1, 2016 in News by admin

blender-logoThe Blender Foundation and online developer community are proud to present Blender 2.78, released September 30th 2016! This release aims to be a very stable one, so that developers can focus better on Blender 2.8 work. Here are some of the highlights:

  • Spherical Stereo images rendering support for VR
  • Grease Pencil is now a full 2D drawing & animation tool!
  • Viewport Rendering improvements
  • New Freehand curves drawing over surfaces!
  • Bendy Bones, powerful new options for B-Bones
  • Alembic support: import/export basic operators
  • Cloth Physics: new Dynamic Base Mesh and Simulation Speed option
  • New Add-ons, individual preferences, Python APIs changes, and a lot of new & updated add-ons!
  • Many more features, improvements and the usual huge bug-fixes list.

For the original post and download, go here.

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